Friday, March 29, 2019

Book Review: Lifeline by Abbey Lee Nash

Release Date: May 8, 2018
Publisher: Tiny Fox Press
Format: ebook
Pages: 294 pages
Genre:  YA/Substance Abuse
Buy: Kindle | Paperback 

Synopsis:

Eli had everything until one party took it all away...

...until an overdose at a party takes it all away.

After nearly dying in the ER, Eli agrees to go to LakeShore Recovery Center, an inpatient substance abuse treatment program where he’ll spend the next 28 days.

It's there that Eli meets Libby, the sharp-edged artist, whose freshly tattooed scars mirror the emotional scars Eli tries his best to ignore. Eli soon learns that if he's to have any chance at a future, he'll first have to confront his past.

Review: 

In the midst of the United States opiate epidemic this is a timely read. Eli has everything, goes to a private school, is captain of the lacrosse team, has a beautiful girlfriend but he also has a heroin addiction. Eli doesn't believe he has a problem he thinks he can stop anytime but his life is falling apart and when he winds up in the hospital after an overdose he has no choice but to go to rehab. Still under the disillusion that he doesn't have a problem Eli finds himself at Lake Shore Recovery Center where he starts the slow processes of recovery.

As someone who has dealt with a lot of addicts this book is fairly spot on. The denial, the not wanting to deal with emotions etc Recovery is a long road that is sometimes dark and difficult. Relapse is frequent and that many of Eli's friends in rehab had either been there before or wind up back after they leave is not uncommon and I was happy she included it in the book. Looking at yourself and taking responsibility for our actions is not always easy, its so much easier to blame someone else.

This is a well written book with good characters and some realistic portrayals. I've seen the inside of too many rehabs and the program that Eli goes through is very accurate to many rehab facilities. I'm happy that Eli is a well off white kid from the burbs because these are often the kids whose families are in denial that their kids are using. But heroin is everywhere and its one of the hardest drugs to kick but if you stick it out and really want to succeed you will.






Disclaimer: I received an advanced copy of this book from the publisher through Book Sirens in exchange for an honest review.

Discover other books or products I like: https://www.amazon.com/shop/readinggrrl 

Thursday, March 28, 2019

International Book Festivals

If you are looking for something bookish to do here is a list of North American Book Festivals coming up, if you would like to see more book fairs and festivals across the world go to https://www.kotobee.com/blog/international-book-fairs-2019/ - HAPPY READING!


Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Audio Book Review: The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success by Deepak Chopra

Release Date:December 16, 1999
Publisher: New World Library
Format: Audio
Length: 1 hours 26 minutes
Narrator: Deepak Chopra
Genre:new age spirituality
Buy: Audible | Kindle 


Synopsis: 

Looking for a practical guide to the fulfillment of your dreams? Based on natural laws which govern all of creation, this audio shatters the myth that success is the result of hard work, exacting plans, or driving ambition. In The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success, Deepak Chopra distills the essence of his teachings into 7 simple, yet powerful principles that can easily be applied to create success in all areas of your life.

Review:

Quick read which is a good thing since this is one. you may want or need to read over and over. Deepak Chopra gives you 7 things that he refers to as laws that if you practice will help you live a more fulfilling life. Letting go of ego and realizing that you have infinite potential.  Through meditation, silence, and being in nature we can reconnect with our potential.  I'm not going to give you the 7 laws you will need to read the book for yourself. This seems like easy simple stuff and it is and it isn't. Deepak Chopra gives you the tools you need to succeed and ways in which to practice them.



Monday, March 25, 2019

ARC Book Review: The Library of Lost and Found by Phaedra Patrick

Release Date: March 26, 2019
Publisher: Park Row
Format: ebook
Pages: 352 pages
Genre:  Fiction
Buy: Kindle | Paperback 

Synopsis:

Librarian Martha Storm has always found it easier to connect with books than people—though not for lack of trying. She keeps careful lists of how to help others in her superhero-themed notebook. And yet, sometimes it feels like she’s invisible.

All of that changes when a book of fairy tales arrives on her doorstep. Inside, Martha finds a dedication written to her by her best friend—her grandmother Zelda—who died under mysterious circumstances years earlier. When Martha discovers a clue within the book that her grandmother may still be alive, she becomes determined to discover the truth. As she delves deeper into Zelda’s past, she unwittingly reveals a family secret that will change her life forever.

Review: 

I really loved this book. Martha Storm lost herself somewhere along the path of life.  She was a carefree child who loved to write and dance with her grandmother.  Her fathers strict rules and guidelines took over as she cared for her parents when they got older.  Leaving behind a man who loved her and a life she didn't have. Her life is about to change when she receives a broken book filled with fairy tales that she created when she was a child with an inscription from her grandmother dated 3 years after she died, or at least when she was supposed to have died.

This is a story of finding yourself, of remembering how to live and be true to yourself.  To remember to take care of yourself and not continually put others before yourself.  It is about secrets and how they destroy families and it is about not trying to change people to fit who you want them to be. This is a beautiful story that warms the heart. Reading it is like being wrapped in a warm hug and told you can be anything you want, you just have to dream it. 






Disclaimer: I received an advanced copy of this book from the publisher through netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review.

Discover other books or products I like: https://www.amazon.com/shop/readinggrrl 

Friday, March 22, 2019

Book Review: A Map of the Dark (The Searchers Book 1) by Karen Ellis

Release Date: March 12, 2019
Publisher: Mulholland Books
Format: ebook
Pages: 320 pages
Genre:  Mystery/Thriller
Buy: Kindle | Paperback

Synopsis:

Even as her father lies dying in a hospital north of New York City, FBI Agent Elsa Myers can't ignore a call for help. A teenage girl has disappeared from Forest Hills, Queens, and during the critical first hours of the case, a series of false leads obscures the fact that she did not go willingly.

As the hours tick by, the hunt for the girl deepens into a search for a man--who may have been killing for years. Elsa's carefully compartmentalized world begins to collapse around her. She can find missing people, but she knows too well how it feels to be lost. Everything she has buried--her fraught relationship with her sister and niece, her self-destructive past, her mother's death--threatens to resurface, with devastating consequences.

Review: 

This is the first book in the series.  I read the 2nd one first but this one really gives me some background on Elsa and NYPD detective Lex Cole. Elsa is an FBI agent in charge of helping find missing kids.  She should probably be on leave since her father is dying and she is trying to split her attention between her father and her case. Lex Cole is the detective in charge of the case, he asked for Elsa's help on this case and so far hasn't been disappointed. He does however keep trying to break through her walls to form a friendship.

As Elsa's father declines she keeps being brought back to the past, her abusive mother and why her father never helped her. This is a good book that not only focuses on the mystery of who kidnapped a young girl on her way home from school but also what happens when we revisit our past. The scars they create and how hard it is to break down walls and let others in. Well written characters, interesting story line.  I wish I had read this one first but either way works, they can easily stand alone but you get much more insight into the characters when you read them in order.

Trigger warning there are scenes related to cutting. 





Disclaimer: I received an advanced copy of this book from the publisher through netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review.

Discover other books or products I like: https://www.amazon.com/shop/readinggrrl 

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Book Review: The Competition by Cecily Wolfe

Release Date: August 9, 2018
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing
Format: ebook
Pages: 306 pages
Genre:  YA
Buy: Kindle | Paperback 

Synopsis:

For Mary Sofia, The Penultimate writing competition is more than a chance at a free college education; she wants to show her younger siblings that they can all rise above their violent family history. For Raiden, the pressure to succeed comes from within, although he knows that family traditions play a part in his determination. For Camara, writing fiction is almost compulsive, but her own dark secret may be the best story she can ever tell. For Michael, swimming and writing fit his introverted personality perfectly, but meeting a smart and beautiful girl at The Penultimate makes stepping outside of his comfort zone easy. All four will compete against each other along with 96 other high school juniors for the chance of a lifetime: a full scholarship to a prestigious private college. Some students will do anything to win, but others may pay the price.

Review: 

This is a good solid story about several different teenagers from different schools coming together to compete in a writing competition that could give the winner a full scholarship. Some of the kids need it others don't but would like the honor of it. Of all the teens competing we learn about Camara, Raiden, Jada, Mary Sofia, Michael and Julia.  Mary Sofia and Camara have secrets that they are worried about people learning about, Julia and Jada are their best friends and share a knowledge about their friends secrets. Michael and Raiden both have their own struggles.

I wasn't sure how I was going to feel about this book which basically takes place over a 2 days but it dug deep and Wolfe really created fully dimensional characters that spoke to me. I could feel their angst, their struggle, their insecurities, and their bravery.  I loved that Julia is probably on the autism spectrum and frequently doesn't stop talking about inappropriate things but after the initial shock these kids just accept her for who she is. Some of the kids are shy others are more outgoing just like in real life. I feel like I really got to know these characters, like they were real people which I appreciated. This is a really good book that deals with some tough topics but in a gentle way. 




Disclaimer: I received an advanced copy of this book from the publisher through Book Sirens in exchange for an honest review.

Discover other books or products I like: https://www.amazon.com/shop/readinggrrl 

Monday, March 18, 2019

Audio Book Review: Black Lake by Johanna Lane

Release Date: May 20, 2014
Publisher: Hatchette Audio
Format: Audio
Length: 5 hours 48 minutes
Narrator: John Lee
Genre: Fiction
Buy: Audible | Kindle 

Synopsis: 

A debut novel about a family losing grip of its legacy: a majestic house on the cliffs of Ireland.
The Campbells have lived happily at Dulough - an idyllic, rambling estate isolated on the Irish seaside - for generations. But upkeep has drained the family coffers, and so John Campbell must be bold: to keep Dulough, he will open its doors to the public as a museum. He and his wife, daughter, and son will move from the luxury of the big house to a dank, small caretaker's cottage. The upheaval strains the already tenuous threads that bind the family and, when a tragic accident befalls them, long-simmering resentments and unanswered yearnings surface.

As each character is given a turn to speak, their voices tell a complicated, fascinating story about what happens when the upstairs becomes the downstairs, and what legacy is left when family secrets are revealed.

Review:

This is the story of a family consumed and destroyed by a house that they supposedly love. The house although it is not a person is a big character in the book for without the house this family wouldn't be who they are.

John Campbell inherits Dulough castle but its care and upkeep take a toll on the family finances leading him to turn the castle over to the state to help with the upkeep although they retain ownership. The family moves into the caretakers house as the house undergoes changes and visitors invade what was once their family home.

This was an interesting character study of how a house could suck the life out of a family. As one tragic event leads to another it seems that the bond of the members of the family isn't as strong as the bond they have with Dulough. Beautifully written scenes that make you feel the wind across your face and the lush green of the countryside.



Friday, March 15, 2019

Audio Book Review: Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore: A Novel by Matthew Sullivan

Release Date: June 13, 2017
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
Format: Audio
Length: 9 hours
Narrator: Madeleine Maby
Genre: Fiction/Suspense
Buy: Audible | Kindle | Paperback

Synopsis: 

When a bookshop patron commits suicide, his favorite store clerk must unravel the puzzle he left behind in this “intriguingly dark, twisty” (Kirkus Reviews) debut novel from an award-winning short story writer.

Lydia Smith lives her life hiding in plain sight. A clerk at the Bright Ideas bookstore, she keeps a meticulously crafted existence among her beloved books, eccentric colleagues, and the BookFrogs—the lost and lonely regulars who spend every day marauding the store’s overwhelmed shelves.

But when Joey Molina, a young, beguiling BookFrog, kills himself in the bookstore’s upper room, Lydia’s life comes unglued. Always Joey’s favorite bookseller, Lydia has been bequeathed his meager worldly possessions. Trinkets and books; the detritus of a lonely, uncared for man. But when Lydia flips through his books she finds them defaced in ways both disturbing and inexplicable. They reveal the psyche of a young man on the verge of an emotional reckoning. And they seem to contain a hidden message. What did Joey know? And what does it have to do with Lydia?

As Lydia untangles the mystery of Joey’s suicide, she unearths a long buried memory from her own violent childhood. Details from that one bloody night begin to circle back. Her distant father returns to the fold, along with an obsessive local cop, and the Hammerman, a murderer who came into Lydia’s life long ago and, as she soon discovers, never completely left.

Review:

The death of a young man in the bookstore where Lydia works opens up a pandoras box of memories.  Lydia left town with her father and lived in the woods for most of her life. Running from the fear that the Hammerman, a murderer who killed her best friend and her family while she hid under the sink in the kitchen, would return. While Lydia is content with her life she has an estranged relationship with her father and a strange relationship with her boyfriend. When Joey commits suicide in the bookstore she works in she finds a picture of herself as a child in his pocket and winds up with her picture in the paper leading childhood friends to find her.

Unraveling the mystery of who Joey is and why he left her his belongings starts occupying Lydia's mind, but as it does so do the nightmares of the worst night of her life. Her childhood friend helps her try to figure out her connection to Joey and who the woman is that Joey wants her to find. When the story finally comes around the revelations are startling and scary.

I really enjoyed this book, the mystery of Joey and the clues he left behind are interesting and really spoke to me. The characters were well fleshed out and many were damaged by the secrets of the past. Secrets always come back, and our past has a strong impact on the decisions we make and how we interact with the world.



Wednesday, March 13, 2019

ARC Book Review: The Club by Takis Wurger

Release Date: March 12, 2019
Publisher: Grove Press
Format: ebook
Pages: 256 pages
Genre:  Fiction
Buy: Kindle | Hardcover 

Synopsis:

The Club is a blistering, timely, and gripping novel set at Cambridge University, centering around an all-male dining club for the most privileged and wealthy young men at Cambridge and following an outsider who exposes the dark secrets of this group, the Pitt Club.

As a boy, Hans Stichler enjoys a fable-like childhood among the rolling hills and forests of North Germany, living an idyll that seems uninterruptible. A visit from Hans’s ailing English aunt Alex, who comes to stay for an entire summer, has a profound effect on the young Hans, all the more so when she invites him to come to university at Cambridge, where she teaches art history. Alex will ensure his application to St. John’s College is accepted, but in return he must help her investigate an elite university club of young aristocrats and wealthy social climbers, the Pitt Club. The club has existed at Cambridge for centuries, its long legacy of tradition and privilege largely unquestioned. As Hans makes his best efforts to prove club material and infiltrate its ranks, including testing his mettle in the boxing ring, he is drawn into a world of extravagance, debauchery, and macho solidarity. And when he falls in love with fellow student Charlotte, he sees a potential new life of upper-class sophistication opening up to him. But there are secrets in the club’s history, as well as in its present—and Hans soon finds himself in the inner sanctum of what proves to be an increasingly dangerous institution, forced to grapple with the notion that sometimes one must do wrong to do right.

Review: 

This book seems to be Wurger's first book translated into English.  His other novels are still in German.  Hans is a socially awkward boy who has been deeply affected by the death of both of his parents in a short time frame and his aunt putting him in a boarding school. While at school Hans got proficient at boxing and as he gets ready to graduate his aunt comes to get him saying she needs help.  She wants him to go undercover in one of the wealthy Social clubs at Cambridge but she won't tell him why.

This is a well written, intricately plotted book.  There are layers to this book that unfold as you go. Chapters are broken down by different characters giving a different perspective for what is going on. However there is an Asian character that just always felt out of place.  I'm not sure what Wuger was attempting with this character other than to show how hard it is for non-whites in this very upscale elite club scene.

The privileged don't believe they play by the same rules as everyone else and even once things are starting to fall into place you know that things are never really going to change, that things will be brushed under the rug and continue status quo. White privilege and power play a huge part in this game of whose who and if you fit the profile you have the choice to straddle the line that is good and evil.

Well received in Germany I think Wurger is a name to keep an eye on. I hope more of his work gets translated if its as good as this one was. 






Disclaimer: I received an advanced copy of this book from the publisher through netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review.

Discover other books or products I like: https://www.amazon.com/shop/readinggrrl 

Monday, March 11, 2019

ARC Book Review: Moonlight & Whiskey by Tricia Lynne

Release Date: March 12, 2019
Publisher: Loveswept
Format: ebook
Pages: 336 pages
Genre:  Romance
Buy: Kindle 

Synopsis:

When life gives you curves, you gotta learn how to rock them.

Successful businesswoman Avery Barrows likes her dips and curves, but she’s sick of the haters telling her that she should be ashamed of her body instead of embracing it. Determined to send them a big f*** you, Avery resolves to cut loose during a girls’ trip, hightailing her quick-mouthed, plus-sized self to New Orleans. So, what’s a smart woman with a little extra gotta do to get laid in this town?

Not much if you ask Declan McGinn, the lead singer of BlackSmith. Tall, dark, and tattooed, with a body made for sin, Declan prefers his women as curvy as his guitars. Avery’s sharp tongue and keen mind makes him want her even more.

As they burn up the sheets, Avery and Declan realize this is no one-night (or even one-week) stand. But for all of her bluster, Avery isn’t sure she can handle any more rejection. Besides, Declan has demons of his own. Now Avery has a choice to make: play it safe, or place her trust in the hands of a man who’s as tempting as the devil himself.

Review: 

Anything set in New Orleans usually grabs my attention and this book is no exception. Hot sexy and fun Avery Barrows goes to NOLA with a friend just to have fun but it turns into much more.  Not only is this a hot sexy romance its also a book about being yourself and not hiding who you are. People are cruel, and jealous and petty, you do you, don't mold yourself into someone else for anyone, not for work, not for a relationship not for anything. If you feel good about you it will show. Your weight, you tattoos etc don't matter own your self esteem and show the world how truly amazing you are.

I love Avery's wit and crass quick come-backs, I love that she had a great right hook and that she loves her curves. Declan is just sex on a stick and I love that he loves Avery for everything she is and more. Definitely recommend this romance from this new author and hope she keeps up the writing! 






Disclaimer: I received an advanced copy of this book from the publisher through netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review.

Discover other books or products I like: https://www.amazon.com/shop/readinggrrl 

Friday, March 8, 2019

Audio Book Review: My Struggle (book 1) by Kari Ove Knausgaard

Release Date: February 6, 2018
Publisher: Recorded books
Format: Audio
Length: 16 hours 10 minutes
Narrator: Edoardo Ballerini
Genre: Biographical Literary Fiction
Buy: Audible | Kindle 

Synopsis: 

My Struggle: Book 1 introduces American readers to the audacious, addictive, and profoundly surprising international literary sensation that is the provocative and brilliant six-volume autobiographical novel by Karl Ove Knausgaard. It has already been anointed a Proustian masterpiece and is the rare work of dazzling literary originality that is intensely, irresistibly readable. Unafraid of the big issues—death, love, art, fear—and yet committed to the intimate details of life as it is lived, My Struggle is an essential work of contemporary literature.

Review:

There has been a lot said about the title of this book since it translates to Min Kamp which turns many people away but after reading the first book in this mammoth 6 book fictionalized autobiography it fits. This is his struggle with life, death, love etc. This is a strange book to read, it seems to ramble and drift from one topic to another without much seeming to connect it until later when you realize it all comes down to death. The book opens with interesting observations on death and ends with the death of his father what happens in between seems to be his way of trying to come to terms with this. To try to figure out who his father is and how his father affected him.

As soon as I started listening to this I understood the fascination with these books. Knausgaard has been compared to Proust and I often find myself yawning with some of these "literary masterpieces" but this one touched something in me.  Even though it roved all over the place and I found myself confused sometimes it all came back together, in a brilliantly confused entertaining way. Its almost difficult to write a review about it since it is so different from anything I have ever read. I think I'm going to let this one digest for a while but I will definitely be reading books 2-6. 



Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Audio Book Review: This Fallen Prey (Casey Duncan #3) by Kelley Armstrong

Release Date: February 6, 2018
Publisher: MacMillan Audio
Format: Audio
Length: 12 hours 12 minutes
Narrator: Therese Plummer
Genre:Mystery/thriller, police procedural
Buy: Audible | Kindle 

Synopsis: 

Casey Duncan is about to face her toughest job as police detective in Rockton yet.
When Casey first arrived at the off-the-grid town, an isolated community built as a haven for people running from their pasts, she had no idea what to expect, with no cell phones, no internet, no mail, and no way of getting in or out without the town council’s approval. She certainly didn’t expect to be the homicide detective on two separate cases or to begin a romantic relationship with her boss. But the very last thing she expected was for the council to drop a dangerous criminal into their midst without a plan to keep him imprisoned, and to keep others safe.

Of course Oliver Brady claims he's being set up. But the longer Brady stays in town, the more things start to go wrong. When evidence comes to light that someone inside Rockton might be working as his accomplice, helping him to escape, Casey races to figure out who exactly Brady is and what crimes he’s truly responsible for committing.

In the next page-turning entry in Kelley Armstrong’s gripping series, life in Rockton is about to get even more dangerous.

Review:

This is one of the strongest books in the series so far. When Oliver Brady is forced upon the small town of Rockton, a town that doesn't exist life will be forever changed.

The Council has allowed a serial killer into Rockton, and its all for financial gain. Oliver claims he is innocent and is being set up by his step-father but bodies keep dropping, people you thought you could trust seem to betray you, and the settlers and hostiles who live in the forest seem to be growing restless.

This book is truly a cat and mouse game, is Oliver innocent? Was he set up? Who is helping him? So many questions and the answers may surprise you. Since I read book 4 before this one I knew most of it before I started reading but Oliver's story line and that of the Settlers was intriguing and frightening. Oliver's presence continues through book 4 and maybe beyond but this book truly brings to light how man truly is the most ruthless predator on the planet.

Another really well thought out book with a strong story line. Now that I've caught up with the series I'm anxious for a new one!



Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Audio Book Review: Returning Tides (Provincetown Tales Book 6) by Radclyffe

Release Date: March 26, 2014
Publisher: Audible Studios
Format: Audio
Length: 10 hours 16 minutes
Narrator: Nicol Zanzarella
Genre: lgbt fiction, romance
Buy: Audible | Kindle 

Synopsis: 

A devastating hurricane brings insurance investigator Ashley Walker back to Provincetown, the last place she wants to be. Not only must she deal with the dangerous consequences of the natural disaster, she has to fight her soul-shattering need for the woman she left behind. While Reese Conlon and Tory King deal with the challenges of a community in turmoil, a new threat emerges that proves to be even more deadly than the ravaging storm. A silent killer stalks the night, drawing ever closer to the one woman he believes to be his. Soon, no woman is safe, including Tory.

Review:

Allie has been playing the field so much in these books I was wondering if she would ever have a time to shine but in comes Ashley Walker.  As we find out in this book they had something going when Ashley first came to town and it didn't end well.  Allie is still heartbroken so when Ashley returns things are already heated.   Radclyffe did a great job of showcasing Allie yet also interweaving the other characters we have come to love so much in this series.


Monday, March 4, 2019

Audio Book Review: Sheltering Dunes (Provincetown book 7) by Radclyffe

Release Date: April 23, 2014
Publisher: Audible Studios
Format: Audio
Length: 9 hours 38 minutes
Narrator: Nicol Zanzarella
Genre: lgbt fiction, romance
Buy: Audible | Kindle 

Synopsis: 

The lives of two women and the community that shelters them shatter in a single night of violence.

Ex-gang member Mica Butler is running from a past that just may kill her if she's ever caught. Paramedic and ordained priest Flynn Edwards struggles to recover her faith in herself and find absolution for her greatest failure. Sheriff Reese Conlon fights to embrace the joy of new life while a dark threat bears down on her partner, Doctor Tory King.In one explosive night, the destines of all involved change forever as a man with nothing to lose threatens to take anyone in his path with him to the grave.

Review:

I'm really sad that this is the last book in this series and it just didn't live up to the others. Mica is a gang member on the run and Flynn is a minister moonlighting as an EMT and trying to get over her short lived fling with Allie. This whole book was a a struggle for me.  It felt forced and clunky.  The way things came together didn't work well for me at all. If I had known I would have stopped with book 6 and perfectly content.


Friday, March 1, 2019

ARC Book Review: Last Night (The Searchers Book 2) by Karen Ellis

Release Date: February 26, 2019
Publisher: Mulholland Books
Format: ebook
Pages: 320 pages
Genre:  Mystery/Thriller/police procedural
Buy: Kindle | Paperback

Synopsis:

One of the few black kids on his Brighton Beach block, Titus "Crisp" Crespo was raised by his white mother and his Russian grandparents. He has two legacies from his absent father, Mo: his weird name and his brown skin. Crisp has always been the odd kid out, but a fundamentally good kid, with a bright future.
But one impulsive decision triggers a horrible domino effect—an arrest, no reason not to accompany his richer, whiter friend Glynnie on a visit to her weed dealer, and a trip onto his father's old home turf where he'll face certain choices he's always striven to avoid.

As Detective Lex Cole tries to unravel the clues from Crisp's night out, they both find that what you don't know about your past can still come back to haunt you.

Review: 

I really enjoyed this book, Ellis takes us on an adventure with three teenagers.  Crisp, is bi-racial who has lived his life with his white mother going to the best public school and becoming valedictorian of his class. Glynnie, is a rich white girl who thinks going to the buy weed in Red Hook is an adventure.  She doesn't understand danger and thinks her money will get her out of anything. Then there is JJ, a young undocumented Haitian boy whose parents were deported and he ran away from an abusive foster home. He sells weed to keep himself fed and his goal is to attend school and get into a good high school.

Glynnie's arrogance, privileged and sheltered life lead them into a dangerous situation that has a major impact on their lives. Crisp's mother makes some profound and enlightening commentary on race and racial profiling etc while waiting for her son to be found. The cops who are looking for the teens, Lex, a recovered addict who got in a fight with his boyfriend right before he got called in on this case, and Saki who no one in her precinct understands and may be on the autism spectrum with the way she is so concrete and doesn't understand social norms really help round this book out.

I love the characters the very relevant topics and the interesting unraveling of this story through the eyes of all involved. There is another book in this series but this can be read as a stand alone although I liked it so much I'm going to find the first and dive in. Can't wait for more from this author and this series. 





Disclaimer: I received an advanced copy of this book from the publisher through netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review.

Discover other books or products I like: https://www.amazon.com/shop/readinggrrl 

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